"To the spirits of former years, around which our memories hover."
- J. Herbert Steele, MAC student, 1897 (see Item #234)


Items are numbered in the order I acquired them. I have tried my best to display the items in chronological order within a category (jewelry, pins, watch fobs, etc.). If you discover errors, or if you can offer additional historical information about an item, please email me. I'm always looking for accuracy and completeness.

Donations of MAC artifacts are cheerfully and gratefully accepted with full credit given on this website to the donor. Please give me your name, city, state, and any personal history you have about the item(s) you are donating.
Thank you.

Email me

MAC artifacts: jewelry & pins, postcards, tobacco promotions, watch fobs

MSC artifacts

MSU artifacts

Spartan Plates
Tribute to MAC
Spartifacts, a great collection of Spartan memorabilia


A Brief Chronology

1847 Michigan holds first state fair in nation; speaker promotes agricultural education
1849 Michigan State Agricultural Society formed; advocates a state college of agriculture
February 12, 1855 At urging of Michigan State Agricultural Society, Agricultural College of the State of Michigan is established by Michigan legislature. Joseph R. Williams appointed first president.
February 22, 1855 Pennsylvania Agricultural School formed (forerunner of Penn State)
March 6, 1856 Maryland Agricultural College (another MAC) chartered
May 13, 1857 Agricultural College of the State of Michigan formally dedicated; classes begin
    Note: Artifacts bearing an MSC logo with "Established 1857" indicate that the item was marketed before 1934 when MSC decided to use 1855, not 1857, as the year the school was established. Today, the official seal of MSU shows "Established 1855" at the center.
March 15, 1861 Name officially changed to State Agricultural College... less cumbersome
May 1907 Michigan State Agricultural College celebrates its semi-centennial on May 26, 29-31. Celebration includes numerous social activities and speeches, including one by US President Theodore Roosevelt entitled, "The Man Who Works with His Hands." (Also see "1934" below.)
June 2, 1909 Name officially changed to Michigan Agricultural College, to eliminate any confusion about which state it was in.

Note: MAC is always pronounced "M-A-C," never "Mack." One well-traveled street in the heart of East Lansing is "MAC Avenue." It is pronounced "M-A-C Avenue," yet many today erroneously say, "Mack Avenue."

May 1, 1925 MAC wants to remove the word "agriculture" from its name, but University of Michigan officials oppose the change. Michigan State College of Agriculture and Applied Science created as a compromise, but MSC rarely uses the "Agriculture and Applied Science" part of its name.
1934 Officials from Maryland Agricultural College ask officials at Michigan Agricultural College why they promote the college as the "pioneer Land-Grant college" when it celebrated its semi-centennial in 1907 (Maryland Agricultural College was chartered in 1856). Officials at Michigan Agricultural College confer and decide to begin recognizing February 12, 1855, as the date Michigan Agricultural College was formed, thus retaining the title of "pioneer Land-Grant college"... ten days before Pennsylvania Agricultural School is formed (forerunner of Penn State) and a year before Maryland Agricultural College.
    Note: Artifacts bearing an MSC logo with "Established 1857" indicate that the item was marketed before 1934 when MSC decided to use 1855, not 1857, as the year the school was established. Today, the official seal of MSU shows "Established 1855" at the center.
July 1, 1955 Name officially changed to Michigan State University of Agriculture & Applied Science. On its 100th anniversary, MSC becomes a university, but not permitted to legally remove "agriculture" from its name.
January 1, 1964 Name officially changed to simply Michigan State University. The Michigan Constitution of 1964 allows MSU to finally drop "Agriculture and Applied Science" from its name.
February 11, 2005 MSU celebrates sesquicentennial (a day early), coinciding with inauguration of Dr. Lou Anna K. Simon as MSU's 20th president
February 12, 2005 MSU's official sesquicentennial, celebrated by small group of faithful Spartans
October 7, 2005 MSU celebrates its sesquicentennial with a revival of the Water Carnival (student floats on the Red Cedar), fireworks and a dance. A cool, damp evening keeps the crowds down.
October 8, 2005 MSU continues its sesquicentennial celebration with a three-hour parade down Michigan Avenue and through campus, and the official re-dedication of the outdoor Spartan statue (the original ceramic Spartan statue had been previously moved inside Spartan Stadium to permanently protect it from the elements). Again, a cool, breezy day keeps the crowds down.
October 21, 2005 MSU continues its sesquicentennial celebration with a huge bonfire on the Ag Expo grounds south of the railroad tracks.
<   A question (actually, an answer) from a 2013 episode of the TV game show Jeopardy...


Michigan Agricultural College
1855-1925

Top of page

MAC College Hall (Item #127, #128, #126, #257, #151)

College Hall was the first structure built on campus. Built in 1856, the image of College Hall may still be seen today at the center of the official seal of the University (inset). According to author Kevin Forsyth, the original building had a flat roof; students later built a pitched roof (compare this postcard with the following two). College Hall housed classrooms, laboratories, and offices. But when work was undertaken to renovate the building in 1918, two of the exterior walls collapsed. The building was soon torn down. Ten years later, MAC graduate John W. Beaumont (1882) singlehandedly financed the construction of Beaumont Tower where College Hall once stood. In the first postcard, tree stumps are still visible. They would later be cleared for roads, foot paths and other buildings. The handwritten text on another postcard reads, "College Hall. Oldest agricultural building in the world. MAC, East Lansing, Mich. No. 62."

5½" x 3½"

View other postcards


MAC (Item #249)

Pennant - Originally dark green and cream white, but now greatly faded (back side is still vividly dark green and white). Believed to be from around 1900. All letters and MAC logo are sewn.
33" x 13"


MAC Patch (Item #223)

Light brown leather sewn onto an olive green cloth. Text around logo is burned into the leather with a handheld woodburning tool.

It does not appear to have ever been sewn onto any clothing.

6½" x 7¼" (I think the original size may have been closer to a circle, but humdity over time may have caused this patch to stretch slightly.)


MAC Patch (Item #158)

Appears to have been removed from a larger piece of soft leather... a banner perhaps? Light brown leather sewn onto darker leather. Text around logo is burned into the leather with a handheld woodburning tool.

7½" in diameter


MAC Leather Patches (Item #159)

Appear to have been removed from a larger piece of soft leather... a banner perhaps? Light brown leather sewn onto darker leather.

Each letter is approx. 4"x2"


MAC (Item #141)

Uniform Patch - It is believed that this was part of an athletic jersey worn by an MAC player, but I have not been able to verify that. It is clearly old (faded and dirty with minor moth holes), and because it is so similar to the condition of the 1919 pennant (see Item #98), I believe this patch to be about the same time. Letters are stitched on, and there is some residual stitching on the outside edges. (If you see this in some photo somewhere, I'd appreciate hearing from you! Thank you.)

Heavy felt, 7" x 3½"


MAC - 1920s (Item #253)

Cap - I am guessing this cotton cap is from the 1920s. Nice embroidered MAC logo. No name inside. Probably a size Small.

Diameter at the edge of the brim is about 9"


MAC Scrapbook (Item #244)

"My Memory Book" was made by the Chicago Pennant Company around 1910 (my guess... please tell me if you think otherwise). It was bound by one long black string that tied on the front. It contained roughly 20 black paper pages that could be, but were not, filled by the owner with memories of their days at M.A.C. (maybe this person never attended... ha ha ha). The front and back were made of sewn suede leather. The front had a beautiful hand-made MAC logo sewn into the cover.

Note: I was able to salvage the front logo, but the rest of the scrapbook literally fell apart in my hands! Quite a mess.

Scrapbook was 11½" x 8½"
Logo is 4" diameter
Manufacturer's label, glued to the inside back cover, was 2" x 1"

Also see Item #255


MAC Paperweight (Item #157)

Paperweight with embossed MAC logo. Painted all green, but now has some flaking and oxidation.
Felt on bottom. 2½" wide.


MAC Collector Spoon (Item #196)

Of all my MAC collector spoons, this is my favorite. It is silver, but unlike my other MAC collector spoons, has a strong golden hew. Beautiful "MAC" on an enamel green-and-white flag. Handle has embossed flowers.

5¼" long.

"Sterling" embossed on back side of handle base.


MAC Collector Spoons
(Items #38)

Several variations, including an owl with ruby-colored eyes sitting on a scroll. The spoon pictured at the bottom has "12" hand-engraved on the back of the handle... perhaps a graduation gift for someone who graduated in 1912?

Each is Sterling silver, approx. 5½" long




MAC Ladle (Item #182)
Small silver ladle. Just 5" long. "Sterling" is embossed and "Patented" is engraved on back side of handle base.


MAC Milk Bottle (Item #23)

Quart glass milk bottle

Text is embossed (painted green to enhance visibility in photo; filled with styrofoam pellets to simulate milk).


MAC - 1870 (Item #203)

This is my oldest artifact bearing a date.

Catalogue of the Officers and Students of 1870. A 33-page booklet containing the names of all officers, faculty and students at MAC, including such storied MAC leaders as T. C. Abbott (college president), Dr. Manley Miles (professor of agriculture), Dr. Robert C. Kedzie (professor of chemistry), George T. Fairchild (professor of English), and William J. Beal (Botany).

This catalog (spelled "catalogue" back then) contains some marvelous facts, such as the names of each of its 129 students, only ten of whom were women. It shows which classes were offered by which instructors. It says Michigan residents could attend the college for free (wow!), but out-of-state students had to pay $20 per year. It says students worked for 7½-cents per hour on the college's farm, but that their wages could be applied toward the cost of their lodging and meals.

5½"x8½" (11½"x8½" opened). Saddle-stitched, but very fragile.


MAC - 1874 (Item #129)

Program to the Junior Exhibition (Class of 1875) held August 26, 1874. This cleverly designed four-piece program has a grommet in the corner so each page could be swung out of the way. Interior pages contain the names of guest speakers, songs to be sung, music performed, etc.
Largest page is 3" x 5¼".


MAC - 1885 (Item #15)

Professor Robert C. Kedzie became one of MAC's most prominent 19th-century scientists. Among his many accomplishments, Kedzie helped to end such practices as the sale of arsenic laden wallpaper and volatile kerosene as an early consumer advocate, established Michigan's sugar beet industry, and organized the Farmers Institute in 1876, which evolved into the Extension Program. This envelope appears to have been addressed by Prof. Kedzie. It was sent to his brother-in-law James H. Fairchild of Oberlin, OH. Fairchild was president of Oberlin College; Kedzie was married to Fairchild's sister, Harriet. Kedzie Hall on the MSU campus is named in honor of Prof. Kedzie. (6¼" x 3½")


MAC - 1887 (Item #117)

Class Day program for Class of 1890, held August 5, 1887. Heavy card stock bi-fold with gilded, sculpted edges.

3" x 4¼"


MAC - 1888 (Item #163)

Commencement announcement for Class of 1888, held August 12-14. Invitation specifically asks guests of the 32 graduates not to bring flowers! In the background is the first Wells Hall, built in 1877 as a dormitory.
Heavy card stock, connected by string & tassle. 7½" x 5"



MAC - 1894 (Item #86)

An envelope addressed to Mrs. and Rev. H. W. Hicks of Corunna, MI, from G. H. Hicks at MAC, postmarked February 7, 1894. It once contained a letter from student G. H. Hicks to his/her parents(?). During his studies at MAC, Hicks collected samples of herbs and fungi for research. Such collections are noted even today on a Rutgers University website.

6¼" x 3½"


MAC - 1897 (Item #234)

A letter on MAC stationery (with envelope)

The letter was written May 20, 1897, by a J. Herbert Steele at MAC to his friend Mr. O. M. Leland at 23 N. State St., Ann Arbor, MI (how could he have possibly known, even way back then, that there are no friends in Ann Arbor! ha ha)

"Dear Friend,
Yours of recent date to Rockford is forwarded here and was handed to me the day I arrived at home. I quit work at Rockford early in April and left there about the middle of April. The "old man" had no more money and so I could do no more work there.
I spent part of a week at Oregon, climbing the rocks and admiring the beautiful scenery along the Rock River there. Although the general surface of northern Illinois is rolling prairie, yet along the valley of the Rock River, tributary to the Mississippi, are high bluffs and the rocks which gave the river its name and make it one of the most beautiful streams imaginable.
After leaving Rockford, I spent nearly two weeks in Chicago and returned home via Grand Haven and Grand Rapids. Had a pleasant trip across old Lake Michigan. Spent part of a day at Grand Haven; it was the first time I had seen the place since '93
[1893]. Visited Tom Kiel and called a number of my old friends, and spent an hour at the High School.
Grand Haven seems prettier, if anything, than it used to be, and the High School has changed wonderfully. Only the building remains as it was. I hope it will stand for long years to come because those walls give life and form to the spirits of former years, around which our memories hover.
I found to my great disappointment that Turner and the other university fellows had been home and returned to Ann Arbor just the week before I arrived in Grand Haven. I supposed you had vacation a month earlier, else I should have hastened so as to meet them. I was in Chicago while they were in Grand Haven and had I known they were there could have come across as well as not.
I am not at work at all now and shall probably be idle all summer, except that I shall do some studying at home, and tramp around in the woods or play tennis.
Yours truly,
Herbert Steele

Letter is on standard 8½" x 11" size paper, with a wonderful MAC logo in green

MAC - 1897 (Item #81)

Handbill from MAC Chapel inviting students to a series of sermons shortly before graduation. Interestingly, special services on May 30 were for Decoration Day which would later be called Memorial Day and changed to the last Monday each May.

Printed on one side, index stock

3" x 5¼"


MAC - 1900 (Item #69)

MAC Professor William J. Beal (also see Item #57 above) wrote this postcard to Frederick Richardson of Burlington, VT, editor of International Monthly magazine, thanking him for a copy of his magazine but declining an offer to subscribe. Written February 5, 1900. (5¼" x 3")


MAC - 1902 (Item #116)

Student Handbook published annually at MAC, with helpful information about MAC, train schedules, etc. Cover shows MAC monogram logo. 82 pages. (2½" x 5½")



MAC - 1903 (Item #75)

Guide Book for Excursion Week, August 1903.

Given to attendees to help them find various buildings and sites on campus. Interior has a map of campus; back gives basic statistics (55 buildings, 13 laboratories, 68 professors and assistants, 854 students, $225,000 annual income of MAC).

"If you or any of your friends think of attending college next year, please call at President Snyder's office in Library Building No. 24."

4¼" x 8½" (This is a simple 8½" x 11" piece of glossy paper, printed on both sides, then folded.)


MAC - 1905 (Item #30)

High school diploma - From Bay County Public Schools, assuring recipient of admission to the freshman class at Michigan Agricultural College. (20" x 16")


MAC - 1906 (Item #119)

Complete calendar bound by gold string at top; 6 pages; 6" x 9"
Jan-Feb shows a coed in front of the Women's Building (known as Morrill Hall today); Mar-Apr shows a student of horticulture with pruning sheers in his hand, standing in front of the Botany Building; May-June shows a track athlete; July-Aug shows a cadet in the ROTC program with the Armory in the background; Sept-Oct shows a veterinary student; Nov-Dec shows a student working in the machine shop.


MAC - 1907 (Item #92)

Bronze plaque for the State Board of Agriculture, MAC's governing body from 1861 to 1959. Beautiful MAC monogram logo.

Fellow collector Tim Fox found an advertisement for this plaque (at right) in the 1907 MAC yearbook. The plaque sold for $5 back then! Thanks Tim.

"G + P" hand-engraved on the back.
9¼" in diameter
2.7 lbs


MAC - 1907 (Item #149)

Front page of the Detroit Free Press (April 7, 1907) featuring a story about the May 1907 celebration of MAC's first 50 years, with guest speakers US President Theodore Roosevelt and MAC President Jonathan L. Snyder.

Very brittle.

18" x 22"


MAC - 1907 (Item #60)

Unused postcard announcing the celebration of MAC's first 50 years, with guest speakers US President Theodore Roosevelt and MAC President Jonathan L. Snyder (1896-1915). MAC monogram logo in corners. One-cent postage.

5½" x 3½"

Why 1857, not 1855?


MAC - 1907 (Item #83)

Semi-Centennial Celebration of Michigan State Agricultural College - 377-page official record of MAC's semi-centennial celebrated May 26, 29, 30 and 31 in 1907 (Why 1857, not 1855?). Written by Dr. Thomas Blaisdell and published by MAC, it contains entire speeches from MAC administrators and guests from various colleges, including the speech delivered by US President Theodore Roosevelt extolling the virtues of "the man who works with his hands." Contains a few pictures, and lots of details about the many activities during the four-day celebration. Pages are gilded on top; rough-cut on sides and bottom. Cover is olive drab, with gold hot-stamped text and semi-centennial logo (same logo as on Item #56).
6¾" x 9½" x 2" thick


MAC - 1907 (Item #248)

Semi-Centennial Calendar - Complete calendar bound by white string at top; 12 pages; 6" x 9"
Photos (in order) are of Old College Hall (first building on campus); campus in winter (perhaps along Faculty Row?); Women's Building (later renamed Morrill Hall; torn down in 2013); Abbot Hall; the River Drive (perhaps a campus lane that once ran beside the Red Cedar River?); Botanic Garden, Chemistry Building, Wells Hall; Red Cedar River; cow pasture (on south side of Red Cedar River; hey, we are an agricultural school!); an athletic contest between upper- and lower-classmen; Physics Laboratory, Williams Hall; Faculty Row; and Library, Botanical Building, Dairy. Why 1857, not 1855?


MAC - 1910 (Item #171)

Thanksgiving Day Program (November 24, 1910) - This program says, "Greetings and best wishes from the Faculty to the Students, unexpectedly, by the force of circumstances denied the privilege of the usual Thanksgiving vacation." Jon Backus, assistant to Val Berryman at the MSU museum, tells me that this program was needed because smallpox raged throughout Michigan in November 1910, forcing MAC officials to order all students to stay in East Lansing to be vaccinated immediately. (Thanks for that info, Jon!)

Program says, "Football, Sports and Stunts" at 10:00 AM; "Dinner at the Clubs" at 2:00 PM.

Bears an embossed MAC intertwined logo in lower right corner.

Paper. Size 4" x 7", bound with gold cord


MAC Ceramic Mugs - c.1910 (Item #106)

Ceramic mugs with special thumb mold for easy hoisting. Some wonderful crackling on the surface of both, supporting the belief they were made around 1910.

Made by Langrock Brothers, New York.

Both are 5¼" high


MAC - 1911 (Item #240)

Commencement Program - This is a brown leather-bound program for Commencement Exercises held June 20, 1911. The booklet contains the graduation program, names of class officers, various committees and their members, then the names of all graduates in their various disciplines.

Program is 4½" x 7½"


MAC - 1911 (Item #113)

Freshman Cap (Beanie) - In the early 1900s, the MAC Student Handbook specified that "Each and every Freshman shall wear at all times during the Fall and Spring Terms, except on Sunday, caps." The official cap was brown with a small visor and a green button. The tradition continued until 1920 when a new rule stated, "first-year men must wear freshman lids the year around." After enduring a year of cap-wearing, a celebration called "Cap Night" was held, during which freshmen threw their caps into a large bonfire. The tradition continued until 1933. The only change was during World War I when Freshman Caps were collected and donated to war relief efforts rather than burned. (My thanks to fellow collector Neil Baron for information about Freshman Caps.)

The Freshman Cap (or beanie) shown here was owned and worn by MAC engineering student Earl Sayres ("E. Sayres" printed on interior leather sweatband). He played MAC football as a senior in 1915. Sayres later gave his cap to his son Frank, who sold it years later to Lora Campbell Tebbetts of Tecumseh, MI. Frank Sayres passed away in 2005; Lora sold it to my friend Tim Fox in 2006 who then sold it to me.

Brown cloth with green button on top; leather interior sweatband. Made by US Cap Company, Detroit. Size 7⅛


MAC - 1912 (Item #123)

Ribbons from the October 25, 1912, annual barbecue for the Class of 1915... and from the Fifth Annual Cap Night for the Class of 1916. I do not know what activities the annual Cap Night would have included.

Previous owner used some kind adhesive at top and bottom of ribbons to affix to a scrapbook, thus the blemishes.

Also see Item #124 below from 1914.

Both ribbons are 6" tall.


MAC - 1913 (Item #148)

Student Handbook published annually at MAC, with helpful information about MAC such as a school calendar, school regulations, athletics, various student organizations, etc.

This artifact is very tattered and fragile.

142 pages.

5¼" x 2¾"


MAC - 1913 (Item #118)

Commencement Program

This is a brown leather-bound program for Commencement Exercises held June 24, 1913. The booklet contains the graduation program, names of class officers, various committees and their members, then the names of all graduates in their various disciplines. It shows a rarely-used MAC logo on top and a different MAC logo at the bottom. The bottom logo has the State of Michigan seal at the center, and 1857 in Roman numerals at the bottom. Why 1857, not 1855? Measures 5" x 6½"


MAC - 1913 (Item #176)

Dance Card from the February 21, 1913, Senior Dance at the Agricultural Building. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This dance card room for had 18 dances (some were Waltzes, some were the Two Step) plus two "extra" dances.

Bound by a blue cord. 2" x 4¼"


MAC - 1913 (Item #177)

MAC Band Party Dance Card from April 18, 1913, at the MAC Armory. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This dance card had room for 18 dances (some were Waltzes, some were the Two Step).

Bound by a gold cord. 3" x 5¼"


MAC - 1913 (Item #178)

Dance Card from March 15, 1913, at the MAC Armory. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This dance card had room for 18 dances.

Sponsored by the Eunomian-Aurorean Society. I do not have much information about this group, but Wikipedia says in 4th century Christianity, Eunomians believed that Jesus was of a different nature and in no way like that of God, the Father.

Music provided by Logan's Orchestra.

Leather, bound by a gold cord. 2¼" x 3¾"


MAC - 1914 (Item #239)

Commencement Program - This is a brown leather-bound program for Commencement Exercises held June 23, 1914. The booklet contains the graduation program, names of class officers, various committees and their members, then the names of all graduates in their various disciplines.

Inside this program was also a name card for MAC student Ulrich Conrad Zeluff who graduated this day with a degree in horticulture.

This item shows the great influence University of Michigan had on MAC during its formative years. MAC had not yet adopted a standard "corporate identity" like the Block-S or today's "Sparty" logo. Instead, it sometimes used a modified Block-M like that used by UM. (Also see Item #20.)

Program is 5" x 6½"; name card is 3" x 1½"


MAC - 1914 (Item #124)

Ribbon from the Seventh Annual Cap Night held June 18, 1914, for the Class of 1916. I do not know what activities the annual Cap Night would have included.

Previous owner used some kind adhesive at top and bottom of ribbon to affix to a scrapbook, thus the blemishes.

Also see Item #123 above from 1912.

6" tall


MAC - 1915 (Item #125)

Pocket football schedule with all scores filled in. A great year for Coach John Macklin and his Aggies who went 5-1-0, including an impressive 24-0 win over Michigan! The Aggies scored 259 points and gave up only 38. Macklin is MSU's winningest coach by percentage (85.3%). Super MAC mongram logo printed in green; all other text printed in black. Made of hard index stock, card is 2½" x 4" when folded.


MAC - 1917 (Item #241)

Commencement Program - This is a brown leather-bound program for Commencement Exercises held June 1, 1917. The booklet contains the graduation program, names of class officers, various committees and their members, then the names of all graduates in their various disciplines.

Program is 4½" x 7"


MAC - 1917 (Item #179)

Diploma for Arthur Witty Billings who earned a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering on June 1, 1917. Signed by MAC President Frank S. Kedzie, son of famed MAC chemistry professor Robert C. Kedzie (see Item #15 from 1885 above). Printed on a thin plastic material, sensitive to heat. Diploma contains an embossed "Michigan State Board of Agriculture" seal with intertwined MAC logo. 19" x 15"

Note: On 5/28/09, I received an email from a Diana Landis who wrote, "Bob, I just Googled my grandfather's name, and your website came up with his name. He is my father's Dad and lived in Michigan before he moved to California where my father, his twin brother, their other brother and sister were born." Wow... the power of the internet!


MAC - 1917 (Item #107)

Student Handbook published annually at MAC, with helpful information about MAC such as a school calendar, school regulations, athletics, various student organizations, etc. Shown here is the section on Athletics with a photo of MAC football Coach Chester Brewer. Text reads, in part, "The student body should plan to give its loyal support, and make the men feel that the efforts which they put forth are appreciated." Cover shows YMCA logo with MAC and 1917-18 in gold hot stamp. 151 pages. (5¼" x 2¾") This item was graciously donated by Gail Williamson of Columbus, OH, who wanted to share its splendor with Spartans everywhere. Thank you Gail!


MAC - 1918 (Item #255)

This scrapbook belonged to MAC student Ruth Stanton of Caledonia, MI (also see Item #254). It contains friends' autographs, home addresses and their birthdates. It contains many photos, invitations to events, programs, etc. Roughly 80 interior pages.

15" x 11"

Also see Item #244


MAC - 1918 (Item #254)

Student Handbook published annually at MAC, with helpful information about MAC such as a school calendar, school regulations, athletics, various student organizations, etc. Black cover shows YMCA logo with MAC and 1918-1919 in gold hot stamp. 84 pages.

This handbook belonged to MAC student Ruth Stanton of Caledonia, MI (also see Item #255).

5¼" x 2¾"



MAC - 1919 (Item #98)

Pennant - Dark blue felt sewn to dark green; all letters and numerals are sewn. A delicate piece with several moth holes, but still marvelous.

28" x 11"


MAC - 1921 (Item #216)

Dance Card in green heavy paper jacket. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This Dance Card is for the MAC Varsity Fall Term Party held December 3, 1920, at the MAC Gymnasium (for the graduating Class of 1921).

2¼" x 3½"


MAC - 1921 (Item #217)

Dance Card in heavy paper jacket with two binding rings and green-and-white lanyard (love the colors!). Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This Dance Card is for the MAC Varsity Club Formal Party held February 12, 1921, at the MAC Gymnasium.

Two of the sponsoring Patrons listed in this card are Director and Mrs. Brewer. Chester Brewer was MAC football coach from 1903-1910 and again in 1917. He is credited with promoting the consistent use of Green and White as the school's official colors.

2¼" x 3¾"


MAC - 1921 (Item #215)

Dance Card in greenish brown leather jacket with a maize-and-blue lanyard (who chose THOSE colors?!). Very small embossed intertwined MAC logo on the cover. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This Dance Card is for the MAC Senior Winter Term Formal Party held February 18, 1921, at the Women's Club House.
2½" x 3½"


MAC - 1921 ? (Item #218)

Dance Card in heavy paper with green lanyard. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This Dance Card shows no dates of the MAC Varsity Club Dance, but is believed to be from 1921.

One of the sponsoring Patrons listed in this card is Director C. L. Brewer. Chester Brewer was MAC football coach from 1903-1910 and again in 1917. He is credited with promoting the consistent use of Green and White as the school's official colors.

2¼" x 3½"



MAC - 1920s (Item #219)

Glass Slide - Bob Holbrook of Claremont, NH, sent me dozens of glass slides that were used in the 1920s during classes at MAC to project images against a large screen in a classroom. Each slide (4" x 3¼") consists of a photo cell sandwiched between two pieces of glass that were then taped shut. These were early versions of what we would later call "slides" (acetate photos in plastic mounts). Many of Bob's glass slides had a paper label affixed to the edge, showing that they were once property of the MAC Physics Department.

My special thanks to Bob for his generous donation to this collection. He asked that his donation be made in memory of his father-in-law, Henry L. R. Chapman. According to MSU historian Val Berryman, Chapman was head gardener of Beal Gardens (1926-27), Botanist in charge of Beal Botanical Gardens and Beal Greenhouse (1939-40), assistant professor in Botany (1955-56), and assistant professor emeritus (1957-58). The slide shown here is of legendary MAC Botany Professor William J. Beal. Bob says he found the slides in his wife's belongs after she passed away this year (2011). My sympathies for the loss of his wife.


MAC - 1920s (Item #180)

Paperweight - This is a horseshoe-shaped paperweight with "MAC" stamped at the top (technically, at the bottom because horseshoes are supposed to hang with the open end upward so they can "catch" the luck). There is some speculation on my part that this could be a promotional piece from some company not associated with Michigan Agricultural College. But fellow MAC collector Tim Fox also owns one, and believes it to be authentic. It would make sense (horse sense?... oooo, sorry!) that MAC would have such an item due to its great involvement with horses in the 1920s.

Cast iron with the ends turned up slightly; indentations that simultate holes for nails.

2½" wide. Weighs 3½ ounces.


MAC - 1920s (Item #166)

Varsity sweater - I only WISH I owned this.

It appears to be an authentic varsity sweater from the 1920s. According to the seller, "It appears to be hand-made, with gathered knitting at the wrists and waist, and a rolled-down turtleneck collar area. Interlocking green felt lettering MAC logo has been stitched to the front of the cream-colored garment." It was offered by Mastro Auctions which has a good reputation for offering authentic items.


MAC - 1923 (Item #224)

Campus Map - This is a wonderful black-and-white print (not original) of an artist's rendering of how the MAC campus looked in 1923. Viewer is looking toward the southeast. There is a street car on a track about where Campbell Hall is today. The track ran to downtown Lansing, and operated from 1894 to 1929. Also, a track & field arena is shown where Kobs Field and McLane Baseball Stadium are today.

Map shows "Copyright 1923 G. N. Swanson and E. M. Chapman" in the lower left, and "Jahn & Ollier, Chicago, Ill" in the lower right.

19" x 26"


MAC - 1923 (Item #212)

Dance Card in metal jacket (probably brass) with string lanyard. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners. This Dance Card is for the MAC Sophomore Prom (Class of 1925) held June 1, 1923, at the MAC Gymnasium.

This item is unique in my collection. It shows the college seal with a date of 1858. I have never seen any MAC seal with a date of anything other than 1857.

The unusual seal contains three symbols: an open book, probably representing Knowledge; a surveyor's transit, probably representing Engineering; and a plow, probably representing Agriculture. (Thanks to my friend Tim Fox for the research on this unusual seal. Tim says the same seal appears on the cover of the 1921 MAC yearbook, but with no accompanying explanation of the symbols.)

1¾" x 2½"


MAC - 1923 (Item #110)

Hand Bill - Small paper advertisement for the 1923 Horse Show on campus.

2¼" x 2¾"


MAC - 1923 (Items #172)

Union Memorial Building - Photo of MAC students pulling tree stumps, clearing the way for construction of the Union Memorial Building (today's Union) in November 1923. The photo says, "MAC men and 'Henry' can do it!" ("Henry" was obviously Henry Ford's Model T.)

My special thanks to Jeff Stahl of Pisgah Forest, NC, for graciously donating this photo. Jeff's father was Dr. Arthur Stahl, an MAC graduate.


MAC - 1923 (Items #173)

West Entrance - Photo of west entrance to campus. I believe this view would be from Grand River Avenue, looking southeast into campus.

My special thanks to Jeff Stahl of Pisgah Forest, NC, for graciously donating this photo. Jeff's father was Dr. Arthur Stahl, an MAC graduate.


MAC - 1923 (Items #174)

Basketball Player? - Photo of a Michigan Aggie, predecessor to the Michigan State Spartan. I do not know which sport is represented here... basketball perhaps? I also do not know this player's name.

My special thanks to Jeff Stahl of Pisgah Forest, NC, for graciously donating this photo. Jeff's father was Dr. Arthur Stahl, an MAC graduate.


MAC - 1923 (Items #175)

North Entrance - Photo of north entrance to campus. I believe this view would be from Grand River Avenue and Abbott Road, looking south into campus.

My special thanks to Jeff Stahl of Pisgah Forest, NC, for graciously donating this photo. Jeff's father was Dr. Arthur Stahl, an MAC graduate.


MAC - 1924 (Item #252)

Commencement Program

This is a brown leather-bound program for the Commencement Exercises held June 16, 1924. The booklet contains the names of class officers, various committees and their members, then the names of all graduates in their various disciplines.

4½" x 6"

My special thanks to Jerry Dean of Albion, MI, for graciously donating this item!


MAC - 1924 (Item #111)

Dance Card (with original pencil attached) from 1924 MAC Junior Hop. Dance cards helped coeds track the order of dances with their partners.

The pencil cord was blue and yellow... much too close to maize-and-blue for me! Let's hope this was the last time such color combination was permitted on the MAC campus!

Leather embossed with MAC logo; unused.

2¾" x 4"


MAC - 1924 (Item #112)

Leather Wallet from 1924 MAC Junior Hop.
Embossed with MAC logo, leather, bi-fold. 4" x 3½" (closed).


MAC replica (Item #154)

Sandblasted rock - I wish I could tell you this is old, but it's not. I had the MAC logo sandblasted into this rock. The logo was then painted black.

The rock stands 7¼" tall, and weighs 6 pounds. The logo is about ¼" deep into the rock.


Jewelry & Pins
Top of page

MAC (Item #162)

Hat badge from a band member's uniform. Gorgeous MAC monogram logo. On the back are two small "horns" that stuck into the hat and helped keep the badge from rotating. In the center on the back is a round fastener that screws onto a threaded post.

Oxidation over the last 100 years has caused the tips of the logo to turn black, but most of this badge is a shiny brass. The tips are smooth, but I am unable to remove the black.

2" tall, 1¾" wide.


MAC (Item #44)

Lapel pin - MAC monogram logo.

Appears to be copper with hinged straight-pin clasp. Pin is intact, but not shown here (folded behind material for photo).

1" x 1"


MAC (Item #46)

Button, Coat - Perhaps from a band member's coat or uniform? Approx. 3/16" thick with a 5/16" metal loop on the back for sewing onto coat. The back simply says "Superior Quality."

Brass, 7/8" in diameter (½" from face of button to top of loop). Also see Item 211 below.


MAC (Item #211)

Button, Sleeve - This appears to be the matching button to Item #46 above, but smaller... probably from the sleeve of a band member's coat or uniform. Metal loop on the back for sewing onto coat. "M. C. Lilley & Co. - Columbus, O" stamped on the back.

Brass, 5/8" in diameter


MAC - 1900 (Item #64)

Hat badge from a band member's uniform. Gorgeous MAC monogram logo. On the back are two small "horns" that stuck into the hat and helped keep the badge from rotating. In the center on the back is a fastener that screws onto a threaded post. The fastener has three tiny "horns" that gripped the inside of the hat for a firm hold. "The Victory - Pat. Nov 6, 1900" is stamped inside the fastener.

Made of thin metal, gold in color.

1¾" x 2"


MAC - 1907 (Item #56)

Ceremonial badge - This badge was worn in 1907 during the MAC's semi-centennial celebrations (why 1907, not 1905?). The upper portion has a slot into which a piece of paper or cardboard was inserted laterally from the back, showing the person's name. It has a simple safety-pin clasp on the back to pin onto the person's suit or top coat. Different colored ribbons designated various categories of participants... students wore these green-and-white ribbons, semi-centennial delegates wore purple, faculty and members of the State Board of Agriculture wore red, alumni wore green, and other honorees wore light blue. The front of the medallion shows College Hall (the centerpiece of today's official seal), a stand of wheat, a telescope on a tripod, and two men... one with a sickle, the other with a wheel and hammer. The back says "Semi-centennial, Michigan Agricultural College... Agriculture, Engineering, Domestic Science, Forestry."
Made by St. Louis Button Co., St. Louis, MO
1½" x 2¾" (brass medallion is approx. 1-1/8" in diameter)


MAC - c. 1908 (Item #105)

Ring worn by an MAC graduate. "EAG10K" and "CK" engraved inside.

It says "Founded 1857," not 1855. Why 1857, not 1855?

10K gold. Size 8.


MAC - 1910 (Item #160)

Lapel pin (celluloid) with ribbon attached. 15th Annual Round-Up Farmers' Institute, February 22-25, 1910.

Made by "The Whitehead & Hoag Company, Newark, NJ." Whitehead & Hoag began in 1892, manufacturing buttons, badges, banners, flags and a wide variety of advertising novelties in celluloid, metal, ribbons, silk and woven fabrics. The main business office was in Newark, NJ, with branch offices in no less than 30 leading cities, including London, England. Whitehead & Hoag was one of the largest advertisement firms in the world at the turn of the 19th century. They had huge contracts with companies like Boeing, Guinness, Budweiser, Bass Ale, the US government, and hundreds more. They were also responsible for the patent of "celluloid," a high-quality compound used for printing that made the prints more durable and vibrant in color.

Dark green ribbon is 3" long with gold heat-stamped text. Lapel pin is 1¼" in diameter


MAC - 1911 (Item #97)

Medal and ribbon awarded at MAC Sixth Annual Interscholastic Track Meet held May 13, 1911. According to MSU Curator of History Val Berryman, this event was for athletes from over 50 Michigan high school teams to compete against each other while getting a taste of college life.

Engraved on back: "First in 12-pound Shot Put." In very small stamped letters: "Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, NJ. Gold filled."

Ribbon is tattered. I did not try to clean the clasp at top, but a little Brasso really brought out the bright gold of the medal. The picture does not do it justice... this medal really shines! Medal is 1¼" in diameter; ribbon is 6" high from top of clasp to bottom of ribbon.

Also see Item #197 below.


MAC - 1911 (Item #197)

Medal and ribbon awarded at MAC Sixth Annual Interscholastic Track Meet held May 13, 1911. According to MSU Curator of History Val Berryman, this event was for athletes from over 50 Michigan high school teams to compete against each other while getting a taste of college life.

Engraved on back: "Second in 100 Yard Dash." In very small stamped letters: "Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, NJ. Sterling."

Ribbon is green and white. Medal is 1¼" in diameter... top of ribbon to bottom of medal is 3".

Also see Item #97 above.


MAC - 1914 (Item #102)

Pin from 1914 Farmers' Institute and Farmers' Week on the MAC campus, bringing farmers from across the region to hear about the latest improvements in farming. MAC Professor Robert C. Kedzie organized the Farmers' Institute in 1876. It later evolved into the Extension Program. This cellulose button shows the front of Morrill Hall on the MAC campus. Pin made by St. Louis Button Company of St. Louis, MO (patented August 8, 1899). (1¼" in diameter)


MAC - c. 1915 (Item #21)

Varsity lapel pin for members of the Varsity Club. MAC monogram logo.
Made by Robbins Co., Attleboro, MA.
Fold-over safety catch on back.

10k gold. ½" wide


MAC - 1917 (Item #22)

Football charm sewn onto player's athletic letter. "MAC" engraved on top half... "1917" on bottom.
Sterling silver. Spherical.

½" long


MAC - 1917 (Item #161)

Lapel pin (celluloid) with safety pin attached.

Made by "The Pettibone Brothers Manufacturing Company, Cincinnati, OH"

1¼" in diameter


MAC - c. 1918 (Item #29)

Lapel pin with fold-over safety catch on back.

Gold plated sterling silver with green enamel border.

¼" in diameter


MAC - c. 1918 (Item #19)

Lapel pin with fold-over safety catch on back.
Sterling silver.

¼" in diameter


MAC - 1918 (Item #20)

Lapel pin for graduating Class of 1918. Gold with green and white inlay. The MAC logo here emphasizes the Block-M which would later become the logo for University of Michigan.
Threaded post on back with screw-type mounting.

Gold plated. ¼" in diameter

This rare item shows the great influence University of Michigan had on MAC during its formative years. MAC had not yet adopted a standard "corporate identity" like the Block-S or today's "Sparty" logo. Instead, it sometimes used a modified Block-M like that used by UM. (Also see Item #239.)


MAC - 1923 (Item #210)

Medallion awarded during some kind of marksmanship competition, perhaps part of the ROTC military training required of all male MAC students? Engraved on the back is "Michigan Agricultural College, 1923, Inter-Unit Match." Made by Robbins Co., Attleboro, MA. Appears to have once been attached to some kind of clasp or ribbon that could then be worn by the recipient. Approx. 1-3/8" tall.


MAC - 1920s (Item #115)

Pin from Michigan Agricultural College Association with ribbons of the school colors: green and white!

Cellulose button. 1" in diameter


MSC - 1930s (Item #147)

Ring with official seal showing "1857" as year of establishment. Why 1857, not 1855?
Sterling silver.


MSC - 1938 (Item #65)

Lapel pin from graduating Class of 1938.
White and green enamel with gold inlay and gold embossed border. Simple fold-over clasp on back.
"Jostens - GF" (gold filled) engraved on back (Jostens Inc. of Minneapolis, MN).

½" in diameter


MSC - 1940 (Item #120)

Lapel pin from graduating Class of 1940.
White and green enamel with gold inlay and gold embossed border.
"Jostens - GF" (gold filled) engraved on back (Jostens Inc. of Minneapolis, MN).

½" in diameter


Postcards
(All are 5½" x 3½" unless noted otherwise.)
Top of page

Many MAC postcards have "C.E.W." on the card, a reference to "C. E. Walter, photographer, Agricultural College, Mich. Negatives, stereoscopic views, lantern slides and transparencies made to order."


MAC (Item #191)

Postcard showing early MAC intertwined logo. Note the date of 1857. Why 1857, not 1855?

Unused, 5½" x 3½"


MAC (Item #131)

Postcard of the bridge on Farm Lane. The viewer is standing south of the Red Cedar, looking northwest. To the left of the smokestack and behind the barn, you can see the second and third stories of Williams Hall, a dormitory destroyed by fire in January 1919.

Since the dairies and barnyard compounds were north of the river, and the pastures were to the south, for decades livestock was the predominant traffic across the bridge. In the early years, female students were forbidden south of the river. The land on which we now stand was considered "too wild."

Unused, 5½" x 3½"


Red Cedar River (Item #192)

MAC students canoeing down the Red Cedar River. It is unknown which bridge appears in the background. Front is imprinted, "View on Cedar River, Agricultural College, Lansing, Mich."


Red Cedar River (Item #101)

The interesting truth behind this postcard... The front of this postcard is imprinted, "Red Cedar River above MAC, East Lansing MI." But my postcard expert Wally Jung tells me that this postcard is actually a generic postcard used by enterprising merchants who simply printed their own location on the front. He says in all likelihood, it is NOT a photo of MAC students canoeing down the Red Cedar River. So yes, it was sold and mailed in 1911 (see below), but the photo was not taken on the MAC campus. Whoever bought and mailed this postcard in 1911 joins me in being hood-winked!

The back is postmarked October 31, 1911, from Lansing. Addressed to Mrs. J. H. Clements of Dansville, MI. "Dear Wife, They have all the witnesses in on the Barnes case. The lawyers will begin their pleas tomorrow morning. Don't know how long it will take them. I think it will take all day. Anyhow, I hope they won't get through. Just might say we will be out all night. Yours truly with love. Bye bye. J."


Half-Way Rock (Item #152 & #190) was once a boulder located half-way between campus and downtown Lansing, along what today is Michigan Avenue. A seed found its way into a crevice in the rock, splitting the rock as it grew. Half of the rock was later moved to the southwest corner of what today is the Union Building. It remains there today, with a bronze plaque attached.


MAC (Item #193)

Athletic Grounds - Could this be the original Kobs Field? Postcard shows a baseball game, with horse-drawn buggies behind the 3rd base fence.


MAC (Item #204)

1908 Female Cheerleader/Spectator - This rare MAC postcard has a green felt pennant sewn onto the card. A female cheerleader (spectator?) performs a familiar college cheer of the time, "Rah, rah, rah! Uzz, uzz, uzz! MAC!" The sender (unknown) wrote, "Wabash 5, MAC 0." I believe this was a baseball score. Also written is, "Notre Dame 60 1/6, MAC 65 5/6." I am guessing this would have been a track score. (Please let me know if you have other information about these scores.)

At the bottom of the card is printed in small type, "Copyright 1908, Acmegraph Co., Chicago"

It is postmarked May 19, 1908, and is addressed to Miss Hazel Kellogg, 32 South Union, Grand Rapids, MI. Whoever sent the postcard (unknown) wrote, "Detroit won the interscholastic, Muskegon 2nd, Ann Arbor 3rd" on the front of the card. According to MSU Curator of History Val Berryman, the interscholastic meets at MAC were for athletes from Michigan high school teams to compete against each other while getting a taste of college life (see Item #197 in the "Jewelry & Pins" section above).


Baseball Team (Item #140)

An unused, undated postcard showing the MAC baseball team. Probably about 1910.


Basketball Team (Item #138)

An unused, undated postcard showing the MAC basketball team. Probably about 1910.


Macklin Field (Item #40)

Macklin Field (capacity 60,000), named in honor of MAC Coach John F. Macklin who led the Aggies from 1911 to 1915, with back-to-back upsets of powerhouses Michigan and Wisconsin. Macklin is MSU's winningest coach by percentage (85.3%). Macklin Field was renamed Spartan Stadium in 1957.



Football--- vs Michigan
(Items #139 & #100)

First MAC football victory over University of Michigan. The game was played October 18, 1913, in Ann Arbor. MAC won 12-7. It was also MAC's first perfect season (7-0). John Macklin, for whom Spartan Stadium was originally named (Macklin Field), was the coach for MAC. Macklin is MSU's winningest coach by percentage (85.3%).

The top postcard shows the first touchdown (it is unknown whether that was by MAC or UM). The bottom shows the crowd and band (probably the UM band).

The top postcard is unused.

The bottom postcard shows "1913" in fine white print near the bottom. The card was once glued to someone's scrapbook, so the back has four areas where black paper is attached and cannot be removed safely. The sender's message is mostly illegible.


"Bit of the Campus of MAC" (Item #122)

1910, unused (known to be 1910 from similar postcards that were cancelled by US Post Office). Postcard has two green and white ribbons affixed by an adhesive seal bearing an embossed MAC logo.

Also see Item #209

Author Kevin Forsyth says the building on the right is No. 6 Faculty Row, so the viewer is looking west along Faculty Row (now called West Circle Drive). According to Kevin, heading off to the right is the old north entrance that reached Grand River opposite Evergreen Street.


Abbott Hall (Item #88)

Unused, dated 1904.

Built in 1888 as the third dormitory on campus, Abbott Hall was named for Dr. Theophilus Capen Abbot who was MAC's third president (1862-84). The hall was torn down in 1968, then replaced with the current Music Practice building.


Abbott Hall (Item #95)

Dated 1905.

Nellie. F. wrote to Mrs. N. Bald of Thorold, Ontario, Canada, "Does this look familiar? Do you remember our walk? I would like to have you write ever so much." Postmarked December 18, 1905.


Agriculture Hall (Item #77)

Mailed 10/23/1914 in Lansing to George Campbell in Saginaw, MI, from his father.

The new Agriculture Hall (Agricultural Building) was the largest building on campus when it was dedicated in 1909. It was built on the site of MAC's second horse barn, marking the beginning of a migration of the college's farm buildings to sites closer to the farm itself, south of the river.

Viewer is facing east.

(Descriptive text modified from Kevin Forsyth's excellent website. Thanks Kevin!)


Chemical Laboratory (Item #194)

This building, demolished in 1955, once stood where the west wing of the main Library is today.

Postcard mailed 10/26/1910 in Lansing to Mr. Deyo Fox, Wayland, Mich... "Am just thinking of going to bed. Guess it is time (10:30). Your Uncle Howard." The front of the card says Copyright 1904.


Dairy Building / Soil Science (Item #80)

Unused.

The Dairy Building (which later became Soil Science) was built in 1914, and torn down in August 1987. It is still an empty spot on the backside of the parking lot behind Agriculture Hall (see Item #77). Today's MSU Dairy is in Anthony Hall, south of the river on Farm Lane. Open to the public for tours, the store still offers excellent ice cream!


Engineering Hall (Olds Hall) (Item #76)

Unused mailing card - The photo is slightly embossed on the oval edge. This unused and oddly-shaped postcard doubled as a bookmark. Built in 1907, this building was gutted by fire in March 1916. Ransom Eli Olds, father of Lansing-based Oldsmobile and REO Motors, donated $100,000 to rebuild it in 1917. It remains in use today as R. E. Olds Hall, but the Engineering Department moved to a new building in 1962. Viewer is facing southeast. (6½" x 2¼").

Note: According to author Kevin Forsyth, the building that burned in 1916 never carried the Olds name. Olds Hall was a total rebuild from the ground up on the old foundation, and while it looks exactly like the older building, Kevin thinks it's inaccurate to show the building that burned down and call it Olds Hall.


Engineering Hall (Olds Hall) (Item #150)

Unused postcard of a coed walking her dog south from the Engineering Building. This bridge was later replaced by the foot bridge on the south side of today's library.


Engineering Hall (Olds Hall) (Item #109)

Postmarked March 10, 1916... just five days after the Engineering Building was destroyed by fire on March 5. It was rebuilt in 1917, entirely with funds from Ransom Eli Olds, father of Lansing-based Oldsmobile and REO Motors. It remains in use today as R. E. Olds Hall (directly east of the main Library on campus).

Sent by "W. G. S." in Lansing to Miss Leah Finkenauer in Freeland, MI.

Viewer is facing southeast.

Also see Item #233 below.

Note: According to author Kevin Forsyth, the building that burned in 1916 never carried the Olds name. Olds Hall was a total rebuild from the ground up on the old foundation, and while it looks exactly like the older building, Kevin thinks it's inaccurate to show the building that burned down and call it Olds Hall.


Engineering Hall (Olds Hall) (Item #233)

Here are four postcards showing the great fire of March 5, 1916, that destroyed the Engineering Building. I do not own the four postcards shown here (I was unsuccessful in my attempt to purchase them), but I wanted to show you some various views of the fire. I later heard from the seller. He told me the postycards were his wife's grandfather's. He graduated from MAC in 1916. The proceeds from the sale of the items was going to a great-granddaughter who is in the peace corps in Guatemala. (See Item #109 above.)


Library (today called Linton Hall) - 1912 (Item #209)

Postcard has two green and white ribbons affixed by an adhesive seal bearing an embossed MAC logo. Card was mailed August 2, 1912, from Gaines, MI, to Mrs. Frank Elwell in Gaines. It reads, "Dear Hila, I'm so sorry you are sick, and hope you will soon be o.k. again. This is one of the pretty places in Lansing. Another shower coming. We miss you awfully now. We had a blessed time at Maybee. Over 65 seekers. Lovingly, Blanche"

Also see Item #122

This is the oldest building on campus that has survived in essentially its original form. Built in 1881, it originally served three purposes: administration building, library and museum. In 1969, it was named Linton Hall in honor of Robert S. Linton (MAC 1916), former registrar who worked for many years in this building. Viewer is facing southeast. (Descriptive text modified from Kevin Forsyth's excellent website. Thanks Kevin!)


Library-Museum (today called Linton Hall) (Item #94)

This is the oldest building on campus that has survived in essentially its original form. Built in 1881, it originally served three purposes: administration building, library and museum. In 1969, it was named Linton Hall in honor of Robert S. Linton (MAC 1916), former registrar who worked for many years in this building. Check out the bicycles and horse and buggy!

The postmark bears no year. It is addressed to Miss Ethel M. Sabin in McBrides, MI. "Dear Ethel: When far away in distant land, you view the writing of my hand, and if my face you cannot see, by this you can remember me. Your true friend, F. M. C."

Viewer is facing southeast.

(Descriptive text modified from Kevin Forsyth's excellent website. Thanks Kevin!)


Library-Museum (today called Linton Hall) (Item #90)

Sent 12/4/1909 to Clarence Marlatt of Applegate, MI, from his mother. Viewer is facing east.


Library-Museum (today called Linton Hall) (Item #153)

This postcard shows the horse/human water fountain given by the Class of 1900, the Library-Museum (today called Linton Hall) and two other buildings.

Viewer is facing east from just north of what today is the Museum.


Bird's Eye View of Campus (Item #202) - This "bird's eye view" of campus (as the postcard describes it) shows the Library-Museum (today called Linton Hall) the far right, the Agriculture Building on the right, and other buildings still standing today.

Viewer is facing southeast from somewhere around where Morrill Hall (formerly the Women's Building) is today.


Union Memorial Building (Item #227)

The Union was built in 1925 to provide "students, faculty, and alumni such amenities as a ballroom, meeting rooms, lounges, a cafeteria, and barber and beauty shops"

(Descriptive text from Kevin Forsyth's excellent website. Thanks Kevin!)

This postcard is unused.


Veterinary Laboratory (Item #79)

Mailed 6/29/1912 in East Lansing to Miss Jumie Harris in Rising Sun, IN... signed, "W. L. C."

The Vet Lab was built in 1885 southwest of Agriculture Hall (see Item #77). In 1913, the Vet Clinic moved to what today is the original portion of Giltner Hall.


Wells Hall 1 (Item #108)

Unused.

This is the first of three buildings named Wells Hall. This building was built in 1877 as a dormitory. It was named in honor of Judge Hezekiah Griffith Wells (1812-1885), the first president of the Michigan State Board of Agriculture. It was built south of where Saints' Rest stood before it burned to the ground (approximately where the Library stands today). Wells Hall met a similar fate on February 11, 1905 (see below). It was replaced by the second Wells Hall (let's just call it Wells Hall 2 for clarity), built across the street on the site where the Library currently stands (see Item #96 below).

Viewer is facing north.

Wells Hall 1 (Item #93)

Mailed 7/2/1910 in Lansing to Mr. Myron Howley, Jr. in Tonica, IL. No message... no sender's name. Oddly, whoever owned this postcard did not use it until five years after this building was destroyed by fire (see 1905 photo below).

Viewer is facing north.

Wells Hall 1 (1877-1905) was destroyed by fire on February 11, 1905.

Viewer is facing north.


Wells Hall 2 (Item #96)

The second Wells Hall (let's just call it Wells Hall 2 for clarity) was built in 1907 as a student residence, and demolished in 1966 to make room for an addition to the main Library.

Postmarked July 6, 1911. From "Ray" to Miss Erma Dankhaus of Sunfield, MI.

Viewer is looking southwest.

Note: A third Wells Hall (let's just call it Wells Hall 3 for clarity) was built in 1968, just east of Spartan Stadium.


New Engineering Hall / Wells Hall 2 (Item #189)

This is a double-size postcard (11" x 3½" when opened fully). A panoramic view, looking south from about where Beaumont Tower is today. The "new" Engineering Building (Olds Hall) on the left, and Wells Hall 2 in the middle. This Wells Hall stands where the Library does today. On the back, the card is addressed to Herbert L. Glage, 625½ S. Flower St., Los Angeles, CA. Postmarked July 1, 1907. "Dear Dutch, I get through next year. Sticker, eh? Have been working here couple of weeks. Start for Detroit and Mackinac Island tomorrow. Probably go to Duluth later. Wish you were going with me. My brother is at 391 Golden Gate Ave, San Fran. Working for the Presto Pite Co. Liable to be at Los Angeles office in near future. Get acquainted. I told him too. -Jabe"

Note: A third Wells Hall (let's just call it Wells Hall 3 for clarity) was built in 1968, just east of Spartan Stadium.


Wells Hall 2 / Engineering Hall (Olds Hall) (Item #78)

Mailed 10/15/1909 in Lansing to Miss S. Hopkins in Hammond, IN... signed, "F. E."

Wells Hall 2 (right) and Engineering Hall

This was the second Wells Hall (let's just call it Wells Hall 2 for clarity), built in 1907 as a student residence, and demolished in 1966 to make room for an addition to the main Library. The first Wells Hall was built in 1877, but destroyed by fire in 1905. A third Wells Hall was built in 1968, just east of Spartan Stadium. The Engineering Building was also gutted by fire once, but was rebuilt in 1917 as the R. E. Olds Engineering Building.

Viewer is facing southeast.

Note: According to author Kevin Forsyth, the building that burned in 1916 never carried the Olds name. Olds Hall was a total rebuild from the ground up on the old foundation, and while it looks exactly like the older building, Kevin thinks it's inaccurate to show the building that burned down and call it Olds Hall.


Williams Hall (Item #85)

Built in 1869 and named for Joseph Rickelson Williams, MAC's first president. This dorm was the center of collegiate life for many years. The bell in its tower chimed each morning to wake students, and tolled at the end of each class period. In January 1919, it burned to the ground. There were no injuries; students had not yet returned from Christmas break.

Postmarked October 12, 1906. From Jacob Rau (?) of Lansing to Miss Jennie Tatum of Tatum, VA.

(Descriptive text modified from Kevin Forsyth's excellent website. Thanks Kevin!)


Willams Hall (Item #89)

Officially the Sarah Langdon Williams Hall, built in 1937. The viewer is facing southeast from Michigan Avenue.


MSC - 1939 (Item #226)

Postcard - "Entrance to Michigan State College, East Lansing." The viewer is looking south, about where Abbot Road meets Grand River Avenue today. You can see the Union Building on the left.

It was mailed August 29, 1939, to Mr. & Mrs. E. Herrman, 507 Portland St., Belleville, Ill." It reads, "Monday eve. This may surprise you but here I am at Lansing. It is a lovely place, and the Gore family like it here very much. Everybody is happy and are enjoying every minute of our stay. All send our greetings to you. Aunt Mary."


Women's Building (Morrill Hall) and Library-Museum (today called Linton Hall) (Item #201) - This is a double-size postcard (11" x 3½" when opened fully). Mailed 5/30/1907 from Walter Bernstein to Mrs. S. Bernstein, 4344 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA. Viewer is facing east from what today is a large grassy area north of Beaumont Tower.


Women's Building (Morrill Hall) (Item #103)

Mailed 10/21/1909 in Lansing to Mr. Corwin Clark in Ann Arbor, MI. "Have been having an exciting time. Something doing all the time."

Women were first admitted to MAC in 1870. This building opened in Fall 1900 with dormitory rooms for 120 female students, cooking and sewing laboratories, music rooms, a woodshop, a two-story gymnasium, and a dining room on the third floor. It was later named Morrill Hall in honor of Senator Justin Smith Morrill who had passed away. It stands today, though its future is bleak.

Viewer is facing northeast.


Women's Building (Morrill Hall) (Item #198)

This "bird's eye view" is from atop what today is Morrill Hall. Back in the eraly 1900s, it was the Women's Building, a dormitory rooms for 120 female students, cooking and sewing laboratories, music rooms, a woodshop, a two-story gymnasium, and a dining room on the third floor.

Viewer is facing southeast.

Also see Item #103 above.


Monty the MAC Mascot (Item #231)

Long before MSU adopted the Spartan as its official mascot, MAC used a bear to represent the Aggie athletic teams. Why a bear? Who knows! Sometime later, the bear was given the nickname "Monty," for similarly unknown reasons.

This postcard was mailed February 3, 1910, from East Lansing. It is addressed to Miss Tracy Crist, #4, Westerville, Ohio. It reads, "Tracy, Here is a picture of that bear I was telling you about. How would you like a pet like him?" It is signed "A.W."

The postcard was made by "F. N. Bovee, Optician and Dealer in Photo Supplies, Lansing Mich."

NOTE: See Tobacco Items #62 and #130.


Michigan Department of State Police Headquarters - 1941 (Item #195)

This building is located on MSU property at 714 S. Harrison Road, just west of Breslin Center. It is owned by MSU but was leased for $1 per year to the State of Michigan as the headquarters for the Michigan Department of State Police. It was vacated in 2010 when the MSP moved to a new building in downtown Lansing, much to the dismay of many MSP employees who must now pay City of Lansing income tax.


Tobacco Promotions

College Leathers were issued around 1908-1914 by a variety of cigarette brands including Mogul, Murad, Egyptienne Straights, and Turkey Red. They carried no brand identification.

Interesting Side Note: The "Holy Grail of baseball cards," the famous 1909 Honus Wagner tobacco card, sold for a record $2.35 million in February 2007. Tobacco cards used to be included in packs/boxes of cigarettes. Collectors believe Wagner's cards are so extremely rare because once he discovered tobacco companies were using his image for tobacco sales without his permission, he ordered a halt to the practice. Wagner did not want his image to be used if it could somehow encourage children to smoke.

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MAC (Item #13)

Advertising promotion card included in box of Murad brand cigarettes (see box below). This was part of the Murad Cigarettes College Series tobacco or cigarette card. Issued in 1910, this series of 150 cards showed a college seal, pennant and some significant aspect about the school. Each box would have contained five cigarettes. The blue seal visible on the box below is dated 1910, referencing a federal law of August 5, 1903, that required the manufacturer to pay a tax to the US Internal Revenue Service.

Card at left is 2¾"x 2"

MAC (Item #225)

Advertising promotion card included, I believe, in a package of Murad tobacco. Very similar to the item above, but smaller. This was Card #76 of 100 in the Murad Cigarettes College Series. Issued in 1910, this series showed a college seal, pennant and some significant aspect about the school.

Card at left is 2¼"x 1½"

Box below is approx. 3" x 2¼" x ¾" deep


MAC (Item #62 and #130)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco.

Long before MSU adopted the Spartan as its official mascot, MAC used a bear to represent the Aggie athletic teams. Why a bear? Who knows! Sometime later, the bear was given the nickname "Monty," for similarly unknown reasons.

NOTE: Postcard Item #231 is a photo of the real "Monty" the MAC bear.

Top image is silk-screened onto tan leather. Bottom image is embossed in green leather.

3½" x 2½"


MAC (Item #58)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo and letters are embossed onto black leather.

2½" x 2"


MAC (Item #59)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is embossed; letters are recessed in green leather.

2½" x 2"


MAC (Item #134)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is stamped in silver on dark brown leather with nice tooling decoration along the borders.

2" x 2½"


MAC (Item #84)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is stamped in black on tan leather.

2" x 2½"


MAC (Item #66)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is printed in dark green on tan leather.

2" x 2½"


MAC (Item #228)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is printed in dark green on green leather.

2" x 2½"


MAC (Item #3)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco. Silver hot-stamp onto black leather.

2½"x 2"


MAC (Item #132)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is stamped in gold on brown leather with nice stitching along the borders for decoration. Great MAC monogram logo!

2½" x 2"


MAC (Item #133)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco

Logo is stamped in black on dark green leather. Not only does this have a great MAC monogram logo, but it shows the huge influence University of Michigan had on MAC on its formative years. Note the use of the MAC logo within what might otherwise be considered a UM banner.

2½" x 2"


MAC (Item #4)

Advertising promotion included in pouch of tobacco. Silver hot-stamp onto green leather.
This particular item was given away with the purchase of Mogul Egyptian cigarettes.

2½" x 1½"


MAC (Item #14)

Advertising promotion card included in pouch of tobacco

Green silk

Beginning in 1910, the American Tobacco Company offered woven tobacco silks in their Egyptienne Luxury Cigarettes. There were silks for 150 colleges and universities, used as bookmarks or simply a souvenir.

1¾" x 3¼"


Watch fobs
Prior to watches being worn on the wrist, men carried large watches in their pants or suit pockets. The pocket watch was attached to a leather strap or chain with a fob on the end. The watch stayed in the pocket while the fob dangled on the outside, helping the owner more easily retrieve the watch for checking the time.
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MAC - c. 1908 (Item #167)

Embossed heavy brass, with original leather strap.

Stamped on the back in very small letters is "Robbins Company, Attleboro, Mass." This company began by manufacturing campaign buttons in 1892. It is still in business today, manufacturing jewelry for both men and women, marked "Robbins & Co."

1¾" wide

Below is a photo of how it looked when I bought it. What a difference a little Brasso and a soft cloth can make! Some purists believe cleaning such an item somehow reduces its value. I disagree, especially when I see a brass item like this simply glow!


MAC - c. 1908 (Item #5)

Embossed heavy brass. In extremely small type on the back: "The Kinney Co., Providence, RI."

1¼" wide


MAC - 1911 (Item #39)

Available to graduates of the agricultural "short courses," abbreviated classes, about 2-6 weeks in duration... not quite as thorough as the regular curricula, but they still prepared students for the work force... something like what we might call "adult continuing education" today. Letters on this fob are engraved, and filled with black ink, most of which has worn off through the years.

Made by C. J. Mayer, Indianapolis
Base metal, 1¾" x 1¾"

Teaching in agricultural economics was initiated by Wilbur O. Hedrick (1868-1954), of the MAC Department of History and Economics, for degree students at MAC with a two-credit course in "Agricultural Economics." Prof. Hedrick taught the first MAC course in agricultural economics, "Agricultural Economics," to MAC students in 1911. In 1913, he taught the first course in farmer cooperatives at MAC... believed to be the second such course taught in the US. Dr. Hedrick also taught the first course in agricultural marketing at MAC in 1916. He was a humorous and effective teacher. The Hedrick Cooperative House at Michigan State was named in his honor in 1933. (Thanks to my friend Tim Fox for this information.)

At right: A photo of Carolyn Johnson's grandfather Newell Gale of Hart, MI. The uniform appears to be for basketball (also see Item #174). Not sure why he would have "Short Course" on the jersey unless they formed a team with just students enrolled in a Short Course. My special thanks to Carolyn for the photo.


MAC - 1914 (Item #114)

Available for the graduating Class of 1914. Letters are engraved, and filled with black ink, most of which has worn off through the years.

Made by C. J. Mayer, Indianapolis
Base metal, 1¾" x 1¾"


MAC - 1915 (Item #214)

Available for the graduating Class of 1915. Logo and numbers are engraved, and filled with black ink, most of which has worn off through the years. There is some scribbling etched into the back. I will try to decipher the scribbling and post a revision soon.

Base metal, 1¾" x 1¾"


MAC - 1916 (Item #168)

This appears to be an item given away at the 1916 state convention of the Michigan State Grange held at MAC. The Grange (formally the National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry) is a fraternal organization of American farmers that encourages farm families to band together for their common economic and political good.

Contains an image of the Agriculture Building at MAC.

Technically, this is not an "MAC" item, but since it involved activities at and images of MAC, I had to add it to my collection.

Embossed silver.

Embossed in extremely small type on the back: "The Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, NJ."

1½" wide


MAC - c. 1924 (Item #67)

Fob is embossed heavy brass; medallion with MAC monogram logo is a silver-colored, base-metal affixed to the fob. Because the two items are made of different materials, one affixed to the other, perhaps this was an early attempt to convert an otherwise generic item (like a watch fob that says "Michigan") into an item marketable at MAC simply by attaching a logo. Then again, maybe this is exactly the way it was supposed to be. Who knows for sure?!

Fob is 1" x 1½"
Medallion is 1" in diameter.


Michigan State College - c. 1925 (Item #61)

Similar in size and material to Item #39 (see 1911)

Made by C. J. Mayer, Indianapolis.
Silver, base metal. Letters are engraved, and filled with black ink, some of which has worn off through the years.

1½" x 1¾"


Michigan State College
1925-1955

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MSC - 1925-1934 (Item #91)

Letter opener

Bronze, 5¾" long

Note the established date of 1857, not 1855. Why 1857, not 1855?


MSC - 1927 (Item #2)

Football ticket stub - 4" x 2"

Final score: Detroit 24, MSC 7

East Lansing on Central Time? - According to Steffen Thorsen of TimeandDate.com, East Lansing was in the Central Time Zone until May 1924. The time printed on this ticket might have been technically wrong, but since East Lansing had been on Central Time for so long, most people may not have even been aware of the change to Eastern Time. (From the looks of things, our team didn't show up on time, either!)



MSC - 1929 (Item #74)

Commencement Program

This is a brown leather-bound program for the 71st Annual Commencement held June 24, 1929, at 10:00 AM at Demonstration Hall (the background of Beaumont Tower is a silver hot-stamp to simulate the sky). The booklet contains the graduation program (beginning with Lantern Night on June 4), names of class officers, various committees and their members, then the names and home towns of all graduates in their various disciplines (Liberal Arts & Business Administration, Applied Science, Engineering, Home Economics, Agriculture & Forestry, Physical Education, and Veterinary Science & Medical Biology).

It also contains a name card and onion-skin cover sheet belonging to Miss Ruth Isabelle Osthaus of Newaygo, MI. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree.

4½" x 6"

Note the established date of 1857, not 1855. Why 1857, not 1855?



MSC - 1931 (Item #12)

Football ticket stub - Front & back

3¾" x 2"

Final score:
Syracuse 15, MSC 10

Both legendary coaches Clarence "Biggie" Munn and Hugh "Duffy" Daugherty coached at Syracuse before coming to Michigan State; Daugherty also played for Syracuse in 1938 and 1939.


MSC - 1932 (Item #99)

Trophy from 1932 Water Carnival - Resurrected for the MSU Sesquicentennial in 2005 after a 36-year hiatus, the Water Carnival was once a huge attraction on campus. Students would construct floats that would drift down the Red Cedar for review by judges. This trophy was awarded to the winners of the Mixed Doubles canoe race, part of the Carnival. "Essex E. P. W. M. #E2678" engraved on bottom. Appears to be made of pewter or equally soft metal. (Approx. 5¼" tall.)


MSC - 1933 (Item #47)

Pennant - Interesting logo, indicating MSC was established in 1857... not 1855. Why 1857, not 1855?
Felt, 30" x 11"


MSC - 1933 (Item #53)

Pennant - "Established in 1857"
Why 1857, not 1855?
Felt, 9½" x 3½"


MSC - 1950s (Item #208)

Pennant - Small felt pennant given away with the purchase of SkiRockets. Each pennant came in a waxed paper bag. "Save this bag and get Wright Gyro-Rocket Plane that will actually fly. Take five of these bags and 10¢ to the store where you buy your SkiRockets and receive a large Wright Gyro-Rocket Plane with full instructions about how to make it fly. These pennants free with SkiRockets. Get a complete set." Offered by Borden-Cunningham Ice Cream Division, The Borden Company. On the back of the bag: "Many useful things can be made from College Pennants. Try your hand at creating some new ideas." Cap, table runner, beer jacket (a WHAT?!)

Pennant is 4½" x 2½"... bag is 5¼" x 2¾" (I inserted a slip of white paper to enhance legibility.)


MSC (Item #155)

Plaque from what might have been a podium or office door. The back has two threaded receptacles for mounting with screws. Made from a pewter-like material. "Kinney Co., Providence, RI, Pattern Number 95" embossed on back.

9½" wide from outside of scalloped edge.


MSC (Item #207)

Felt Patch

7" in diameter



MSC - 1938 (Item #82)

Football ticket stub - Front & back

4¼" x 2¼"

Final score:
MSC 19, Syracuse 12

Hugh "Duffy" Daugherty played for Syracuse this day; Clarence "Biggie" Munn was Syracuse's coach. Both would later become legendary coaches at MSC.


MSC - 1939 (Item #36)

Student Activity Pass - Admitted student to any basketball game in Fall Term 1939. This pass was the 11th in a book containing several passes for basketball.

Approx. 2½" x 3½"


MSC Paperweight (Item #256)

Paperweight shaped like an anvil. Embossed with MSC on its right side. From the 1940s?

3¾" long; weighs 12.1 ounces



MSC - 1945 (Item #184)

Football ticket stub

MSC lost 27-7 to Great Lakes Naval Training Station (Illinois).

Section G in 1945 is about Section 8 today.

4" x 2½"


MSC - 1948 (Item #170)

Game program for first game played at Macklin Field, September 25, 1948. Michigan beat MAC 13-7.

Macklin is MSU's winningest coach by percentage (85.3%). Macklin Field would later be renamed Spartan Stadium.


MSC - 1949 (Item #26)

Plate - Made by Vernon Kilns, USA (front and back).

Front shows various MSC landmarks: Jenison Gymnasium (now called Jenison Fieldhouse), Macklin Stadium (now called Spartan Stadium), Student Union Building, The Spartan Statue, Beaumont Tower, Agricultural Engineering Building, Berkey Hall, Physics Building.
Back side shown here.

Green on white. 10½" in diameter


MSC - 1949 (Item #27)

Ashtray - Made by Vernon Kilns, USA.

Front shows same images as plate (above). Back shows only name of manufacturer.

Red on white. 6" in diameter



MSC - 1950 (Item #52)

Football ticket stub - Front & back

4" x 2"

Final score:
MSC 27, Minnesota 0

Season record: 8-1 (only loss was to Maryland)


MSC - 1951 (Item #213)

Football ticket stub - This is indeed a RARE item in MY collection... one of the very few things I have in my entire house that is maize-and-blue! A University of Michigan ticket stub from 1951, the year MSC's Clarence "Biggie" Munn and his Spartans won the school's first National Championship with a perfect season, 9-0.

MSC beat the weasels 25-0 that day in Ann Arbor. Life is good.

4" x 2¼"


MSC - 1952 (Item #183)

Sidelines Pass for Football

MSC beat Notre Dame 21-3 this day, part of their perfect 9-0 season and their second National Championship in football under legendary head coach Clarence "Biggie" Munn.

This pass allowed access to the sidelines, probably for a team member, member of the news media or other game personnel. Bottom portion is perforated, suggesting that MSC would collect that portion for recordkeeping. But this pass is intact, suggesting it was unused.

4¾" tall. Heavy card stock. Back is blank.


MSC - 1950s (Item #72)

Button - Gold-colored button with loop on back, for a sports coat. Text is embossed.

¾" in diameter


MSC - 1950s (Item #24)

Milk bottles - Quart, pint, half pint glass milk bottles

Text is embossed (painted green to enhance visibility in photo; filled with styrofoam pellets to simulate milk).


MSC - 1950s (Item #70) - Milk bottle caps for MSC Dairy products (2" in diameter)


MSC - 1950s (Item #55)

Lapel pin - 1¼" in diameter; football is 1" long


MSC - 1950s (Item #63)

Lapel pin - 2¼" in diameter; football is 1" long
Ribbons are green and white, but green ribbon appears faded in this photo.


MSC - 1950s (Item #87)

Matchbook from MSC Union. No matches inside. Made by The Ohio Match Co., Wadsworth, OH.

1½" x 2"


MSC - 1950s (Item #45)

Matchbook - Image of Beaumont Tower on back. Full book of 20 unused matches. Made by The Ohio Match Co., Wadsworth, OH. (1½" x 2")


MSC - 1950s (Item #11)

Celluloid button - Significance of the "W" is unknown.

1" in diameter


MSC - 1950s (Item #17)

Paperweight - Top is embossed image of President Lincoln; bottom shows MSC monogram-style logo

3" in diameter; base is ½" thick; weighs 9.5 ounces


MSC - 1950s (Item #146)

China sandwich plate - Used in dorms. MSC logo in dark green with green trim.

Made by Shenango in New Castle, PA.

8½" in diameter.


MSC - 1950s (Item #142)

China coffee service - Used in dorms. MSC logo in dark green with green trim (creamer has just the green trim).

Made by Shenango in New Castle, PA.

Cup is 3" tall with 3½" in diameter mouth; saucer is 5¼" in diameter; creamer is 2¼" tall.


MSC - 1950s (Item #144)

China fruit bowl and sandwich plate - Used in dorms. MSC logo in dark green with green trim.

Made by Shenango in New Castle, PA.

Bowl is 1¼" deep with 4¾" in diameter; plate is 6½" in diameter.


MSC - 1954 (Item #154)

Pennant from MSC's first appearance in the Rose Bowl.

Final score:
MSC 28, UCLA 20

1953 season record: 9-1 (last year Clarence "Biggie" Munn was head coach)

28" long


MSC - 1950s (Item #206)

Pennant from the 1950s (my guess). 28" long


MSC - 1954 (Item #68)

Lapel pin from MSC's first appearance in the Rose Bowl.

Final score:
MSC 28, UCLA 20

1953 season record: 9-1 (last year for Clarence "Biggie" Munn as head coach)

1¾" in diameter, with straight pin fastener


MSC - 1955 (Item #222)

Newspaper photo - This is an original black-and-white photo released to the news media by Michigan State College. It was intended to accompany an article about MSC turning 100 years old. The photo shows College Hall (the first building on campus) and Beaumont Tower, built on the site of where College Hall once stood.

The back of the photo has an article attached by the Sun City Advance, dated February 20, 1955. The article was attached upside down, so I have shown both angles here.

Note: I cannot find any Sun City Advance, so I am simply guessing that this was a newspaper that once served Sun City, Arizona.

6" x 9" photo


MSC - 1955 (Item #185)

First Day of Issue: 2/12/1955 - Envelope with a canceled 3-cent postage stamp featuring the two pioneer Land-Grant colleges, MSC and Pennsylvania State University (MSC beat Penn State by 10 days!). The "Greetings" card in the envelope explained why the Land-Grant college system was so importrant. It is signed in original ink by "Walter." My guess is this is MSU Distinguished Professor Walter Adams who also served as economics advisor to US Presidents Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson.

My special thanks to Bev Stafford of Muskegon, MI, for donating this item to the collection. Thanks Bev!


MSC - 1955 (Item #18)

First Day of Issue: 2/12/1955 - Envelope with a canceled 3-cent postage stamp featuring the two pioneer Land-Grant colleges, MSC and Pennsylvania State University (MSC beat Penn State by 10 days!)
Also shown is an unused stamp. February 12, 1955, was exactly 100 years after MSU was founded.


MSC - 1955 (Item #73)

First Day of Issue: 2/12/1955 - Envelope with a canceled 3-cent postage stamp featuring the two pioneer Land-Grant colleges, MSC and Pennsylvania State University. Interestingly, the caption under the Beaumont Tower artwork says, "Michigan's Beaumont Tower"... not "Michigan State's Beaumont Tower." OOPS!


MSC - 1955 (Item #28)

First Day of Issue: 2/12/1955 - This is a card with the canceled 3-cent MSC/PSU postage stamp. February 12, 1955, was exactly 100 years after MSU was founded.


MSC - 1955 (Item #16)

Paperweight / Commemorative Medallion - Reverse side has a quote from Abraham Lincoln, "It is for us the living... to be dedicated here to the unfinished work..."

3" in diameter, ½" thick; weighs 6.3 ounces


MSC (Item #238)

Die - This is a small die made of steel. I am not sure what piece of memorabilia it may have been used for, but it appears to have three "alignment tabs" to help the "male" end of the die (this piece) accurately match up with the "female" end of the die, thus completing the strike.

When I bought this item, the seller thought this item was once used to strike class rings. I do not believe so... but actually, I have no solid reason to doubt it. So all I can say is, "Perhaps."

1" tall, 7/8" diameter


Michigan State University
1955 -

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MSU (Item #25)

1960s

Quart, amber quart (rare!), gallon glass milk bottles

ACL (Applied Colored Label). Filled with styrofoam pellets to simulate milk.

MSU (Item #232)

1960s

Half pint glass milk bottle

ACL (Applied Colored Label). Filled with styrofoam pellets to simulate milk.

My special thanks to fellow MSU hockey fan Fritz Kletke of Lansing for donating this bottle to the collection. Thanks Fritz!


MSU - 1965 (Item #121)

Brass medallion commemorating MSU's 1965 National Championship in football. The perfect 10-0 season was blemished only by a 14-12 loss to UCLA in the January 1966 Rose Bowl. Interestingly, this medallion was struck before the Rose Bowl. There is room for the Rose Bowl score, but it does not appear.
1½" in diameter


MSU - 1966 (Item #169)

Game program for what would later be called "The Game of the Century," the infamous 10-10 tie when Notre Dame chose to "tie one for the Gipper."

Played November 19, 1966 at MSU.

Details here.


MSU - 2000 (Item #37)

NCAA Basketball Final ticket stub

Final score: MSU 89, Florida 76

MSU's second national basketball title featured outstanding play by Mateen Cleaves, Morris Peterson and A.J. Granger.


MSU - 2005 (Item #71)

Pictorial Cancellation Commemorative Envelope with sesquicentennial cancellation of stamp, designed by MSU employee Nancy Aitcheson. Despite MSU celebrating the founding of MAC on February 11 (perhaps to coincide with the inauguration of Dr. Lou Anna K. Simon as MSU's 20th president), the correct day was February 12, as evidenced by this document produced and marketed by MSU's Mail Processing Unit.
Standard #10 size full-color soft-gloss envelope, 9½" x 4".


MSU - 2009 (Item #250)

The Spartan statue, affectionately known today as "Sparty." Manufactured by The Memory Company LLC; made in China, of course. Statue appears to be some kind of resin, then painted to simulate bronze. Done very nicely.

9¼" tall
2¼ pounds


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Acknowledgements - My special thanks to author Kevin Forsyth and his excellent website about East Lansing, MI (click here). My special thanks also to fellow collector Tim Fox for his immeasurable help in identifying and authenticating my artifacts. I also want to acknowledge, as I did many times during his lifetime, the invaluable assistance provided by MSU's Curator of History Val Berryman who passed away in January 2013 at the age of 72. Val was a huge help to me. I will miss his cheerful and insightful replies to my many questions about MAC artifacts.